Allodynia Treatment in Ontario

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Allodynia Treatment

 
Allodynia, a word meaning "other pain,” refers to a frequently misunderstood sensitivity to touch that’s associated with fibromyalgia, migraine, neuropathy, and chronic fatigue syndrome. People with allodynia experience even gentle touch as pain. If you have allodynia, brushing your hair, placing your head on a pillow, or even just wearing clothing can be agonizing. If you have ever had a severe sunburn, you will have an idea of what allodynia feels like – every contact of skin with another surface causes intense discomfort.
 
There are three basic types of allodynia. People may experience one, two, or all of the types:
  • Mechanical or tactile allodynia. This category can be divided into two subtypes: static mechanical allodynia, and dynamic mechanical allodynia. The first refers to pain in response to light touch, the second refers to pain that occurs with gentle movement across the skin.
  • Thermal allodynia. Patients may experience pain when confronted with mild temperature changes on the affected areas.
  • Movement allodynia. This type of allodynia refers to pain triggered by normal body movements.
Symptoms can be transitory or constant. Many migraine sufferers, for example, experience allodynia as part of a migraine attack, but it recedes after the headache ends. Fibromyalgia or neuropathy patients may have a more continuous occurrence of allodynia.
 
The problem originates in the central nervous system. Even though the pain seems to come from the skin, it’s actually a process of sensitization called "central sensitization” that occurs within the brain and spinal cord. Pain signals from the peripheral nerves become hyperexcitable and react too strongly to stimuli. They continue to react even after the stimuli that began the process is gone.
 

Pain Management

 
Unfortunately, allodynia is often resistant to traditional pain medications, and it can be difficult to achieve the right balance. There are different treatment options based on the type of allodynia experienced, including sodium blockers, compounds targeting ion channels, opioids, and some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Once allodynia has begun, it’s challenging to stop it, so treatment often includes preventative medication.
 
Many patients find that the side effects associated with pain medication also make life difficult. It’s important to find medication that works to control the pain, but that doesn’t cause other major problems.
 

Pain Care Clinics

 
In Ontario, many patients with allodynia are referred to pain care clinics. These centres specialize in the treatment of all types of pain and have many advantages. First, doctors at pain care clinics have devoted their careers to studying pain relief therapies and to helping patients manage their pain. These knowledgeable professionals keep abreast of developments in pharmaceutical products designed to alleviate pain and keep up with research about new therapies for all types of pain. They also have experience with various procedures that can curtail pain responses, and, in better clinics, access to state-of-the-art technology.
 
If you are having difficulty managing allodynia pain, ask your doctor for a referral to one of Ontario’s excellent pain care clinics. (Most times treatment at a pain care centre will be covered by OHIP.)
 
Live your life to the fullest – consult a pain care specialist today and break free of the pain of allodynia.
Mississauga Clinic
  • 8:30 am - 4:30 pm
  • Closed

Mississauga Clinic

6981 Millcreek Drive - Unit 2
Mississauga, Ontario, L5N 6B8
Tel: 289-724-PAIN (7246)
Fax: 289-914-CARE (2273)

Referral Form
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Oakville Clinic
  • 8:30 am - 4:30 pm
  • Closed

Oakville Clinic

245 Wyecroft Road - Unit 1
Oakville, Ontario, L6K 3Y6
Tel: 289-817-PAIN (7246)
Fax: 289-817-CARE (2273)

Referral Form
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Hamilton Clinic
  • 8:30 am - 4:30 pm
  • Closed

Hamilton Clinic

701 Main Street West - Unit 100
Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 1A2
Tel: 289-768 PAIN (7246)
Fax: 289-779-CARE (2273)

Referral Form
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